For Love and For Life: The 1987 March on Washington For Lesbian and Gay Rights

1988 | Activism / AIDS/HIV / Coming Out / Documentary / Human Rights / Marriage Equality / Social Issues | 60m | USA
Directors: JEB (Joan E. Biren)

The 1988 piece For Love and For Life places the 1987 March on Washington in perspective among the major political events of our times. It recounts how the events were organized, and creates all the immediacy of being there. This exciting presentation explores all six days during which 650,000 lesbians, gay men and their supporters came to Washington, DC and made history. The inaugural display of the Names Project Quilt, the largest civil disobedience ever at the Supreme Court, the first community Wedding and the Harvey Milk Memorial are just some of the events highlighted from this historic March and Rally. The energy and emotions of these events are presented through the speeches and sounds of the March, a comprehensive narration, and hundreds of dramatic images. For Love and For Life is both emotionally powerful and enormously entertaining.

Reviews and Awards:


"Joan E. Biren's amazing documentary is now available from Frameline. For Love and For Life places the 1987 March on Washington in perspective among the major political events of our times. It looks at and recounts how the events were organized, and creates all the immediacy of being there. This exciting presentation explores all six days during which 650,000 lesbians, gay men and their supporters came to Washington, DC and made history. This was also the inaugural display of the Names Project Quilt as well as the largest civil disobedience ever at the Supreme Court and the first community Wedding and Harvey Milk Memorial and we see these in this film. We hear the speeches and sounds of the March, a comprehensive narration, and hundreds of dramatic images. The documentary is emotionally powerful and enormously entertaining.

Just read this sample from the narration: 'We came out in awesome numbers and we came together with open loving hearts. What was most often remembered was the feeling of unity of belonging, the caring that people showed to strangers and acceptance of difference and new a spirit of empowerment. It gave us a vision of what we are struggling to achieve as a movement ...'" —Amos Lassen, July 7, 2016